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By |May 1st, 2022|Information, Podcasts, Research|

“The AI Playbook: Mastering the Rare Art of Machine Learning Deployment” with Eric Siegel

The AI Playbook featured on Bridging the Gaps

The most powerful tool often comes with the greatest challenges. In recent times Machine learning has emerged as the world’s leading general-purpose technology, yet its implementation remains notably complex. Beyond the realm of Big Tech and a select few leading enterprises, many machine learning initiatives don’t succeed, failing to deliver on their potential. What’s lacking? A specialised business approach and development & deployment strategy tailored for widespread adoption. In his recent book “The AI Playbook: Mastering the Rare Art of Machine Learning Deployment” acclaimed author Eric Siegel introduces a comprehensive six-step methodology for guiding machine learning projects from inception to implementation. The book showcases the methodology through both successful and unsuccessful anecdotes, featuring insightful case studies from renowned companies such as UPS, FICO, and prominent dot-coms. In this episode of Bridging the Gaps, I speak with Eric Siege. We discuss this disciplined approach that empowers business professionals, and establishes a sorely needed strategic framework for data professionals.

Eric Siegel, Ph.D., is a leading consultant and former Columbia University professor who helps companies deploy machine learning. He is the founder of the long-running Machine Learning Week conference series and its new sister, Generative AI World, the instructor of the acclaimed online course “Machine Learning Leadership and Practice – End-to-End Mastery,” executive editor of The Machine Learning Times, and a frequent keynote speaker.

We begin our discussion by addressing Eric’s notable observation, highlighted both in his presentations and book, that the “AI Hype” is a distraction for companies. Eric elaborates on this notion, providing detailed insights. Additionally, we explore the suggestion to shift focus from the broad term “AI” to the more specific “Machine Learning.” Our conversation then delves into the challenges faced by companies and professionals in conceptualising and deploying AI-driven ideas and solutions. This then leads to the consideration of whether forming specialised teams and developing focused strategies are necessary to address these challenges effectively. Next, we delve into the intricacies of the six-step BizML process introduced by Eric in his book, comparing it to the concept of MLOps. We then thoroughly examine the BizML process, dissecting its components and implications. Overall, this has been a highly enlightening and informative discussion.

Complement this discussion with “Working with AI: Real Stories of Human-Machine Collaboration” with Professor Thomas Davenport and Professor Steven Miller and then listen to “Machines like Us: TOWARD AI WITH COMMON SENSE” with Professor Ronald Brachman

By |February 11th, 2024|Artificial Intelligence, Computer Science, Podcasts, Technology|

“Sharing Our Science: How to Write and Speak STEM” with Professor Brandon Brown

Sharing Our Science book reviewed on Bridging the Gaps

Science communication plays an important role in bridging the gap between researchers and the general public, fostering understanding, engagement, and appreciation for scientific explorations and advancements. In an era where science and technology shape every aspect of our lives, effective communication of research findings is more critical than ever. This is also a time where there are conflicting views about scientific work and polarizations in societies. This makes effective science communication even more important not only to ensure that scientific knowledge is accessible to all, but also to empower individuals to make informed decisions, influences policy-making, and fosters trust in the scientific community. However, effective science communication goes beyond simply disseminating information; it requires clarity, creativity, and engagement strategies tailored to diverse audiences. By employing clear language and compelling storytelling researchers can effectively communicate their findings, thereby enhancing public awareness and understanding of the profound impact that science has on society. In his recent book “Sharing Our Science: How to Write and Speak STEM” Professor Brandon Brown, a scientist-turned-writing teacher, provides a highly valuable resource for STEM practitioners aiming to effectively convey their technical work to both specialised and general audiences. In this episode of Bridging the Gaps I speak with Professor Brandon Brown; we discuss this personal, practical, and inspirational guide for scientists and technical professionals seeking to enhance their written and oral communication skills in STEM fields.

Brandon Brown is a Professor of Physics and communications specialist at the University of San Francisco. He is an excellent science communicator. He has written for publications such as Slate, Smithsonian, and Scientific American and served as Deputy Director at the Green Science Policy Institute and a Senior Writing Coach for the Strictly Speaking Group.

We begin by exploring the significance of storytelling in effective science communication, delving into diverse tools and approaches such as tension and narrative to enhance the communication of scientific concepts. We further examine the utilisation of relatable examples, including simplifying large numbers and intricate comparisons like the size of an atom relative to its nucleus, to improve clarity and facilitate comprehension. We also address the detrimental effects of disinformation on science communication, which can lead to societal polarisation and divisions. We also reflect on Professor Brandon Brown’s personal encounters, highlighting how adept communication of challenging facts can profoundly influence individuals. This has been both informative and insightful discussion.

Complement this discussion with On Public Communication of Science and Technology with Professor Bruce Lewenstein and then listen to “The Joy of Science” with Professor Jim Al-Khalili

By |February 7th, 2024|Information, Knowledge, Podcasts, Research|

“The Good-Enough Life” with Dr Avram Alpert

The Good-Enough Life on Bridging the Gaps

We live in a society driven by a relentless pursuit of greatness, where we are constantly pushed to attain the highest levels of wealth, power, and fame. This relentless fixation on greatness leads to stress and anxiety, strains our interpersonal connections, fosters extensive political and economic disparities, and contributes to the deterioration of our natural environment. In his book “The Good-Enough Life” author and educator Avram Alpert explores the idea of whether embracing our limitations could pave the way to a more satisfying existence and a more harmonious society. He explains why the relentless pursuit of competition within our social structure ultimately yields no real advantages for anyone and offers a vision of an alternative way of life—an inclusive, good-enough life for all. In this episode of Bridging the Gaps I speak with Dr Avram Alpert

Dr Avram Alpert is a writer and teacher. He has worked at Princeton and Rutgers Universities, and is currently a research fellow at the New Institute in Hamburg. His work has appeared in publications such as the New York Times, the Washington Post, and Aeon.

We begin our conversation by discussing the concept of ‘Good-Enough,’ a central theme in the book. Following that, we explore the notion of ‘greatness.’ In particular, I engage Dr. Avram Alpert in a conversation about his perspective on the achievements of individuals who attain success and fame through their dedication and hard work. We also talk about people who have done great things and made society better. Then our discussion shifts toward the idea of fostering a more equitable and just society, emphasising the potential benefits of reduced competition among individuals. We explore the possibility of a society where each person can rediscover a sense of purpose and meaning, and have their material and emotional needs met.

Complement this discussion with Reclaiming Human Intelligence and “How to Stay Smart in a Smart World” with Prof. Gerd Gigerenzer and then listen to Cloud Empires: Governing State-like Digital Platforms and Regaining Control with Professor Vili Lehdonvirta

By |September 2nd, 2023|Philosophy, Podcasts, Social Science|